ALL SEASONS – END OF OCTOBER

                Hello All Season-ers,

The link this week is open from Sunday  October 29 through Wednesday,  November 1 to 7pm, Pacific time.

Wow, your posts of last week were amazing! Great subjects as well as execution (meaning how you did it, nothing having to do with guns!)

For you who celebrate halloween, hope you have your fill of scariness. Many churches here have a Harvest Fest for the kids, since it has become dangerous with  razor blades or other sharp or hurtful objects inside the candy.

November … thanksgiving at different times for participating countries. In the USA it’s nicknamed Turkey Day. My daughter and hubby’s birthday is also this month.

What’s in your November?

 

 

 

Looks like the birds had a great meal!

 

 

 

 

Barely turning now in N. California

 

 

 

In a recent talk between our neighbors  (still have a job in the city) and their relatives who visited them for the first time. Our conclusion  about life in the forest at 3000 feet, was that the bottom line was about “wood.” The organized ones have their wood pile for winter ready by the end of September!
That means the year is divided in two parts. When it is not winter, you are “preparing for winter.”In the city,  winter means you just put a coat and sweater on.

To be self sufficient on the country side can become complicated, when you have problems with the septic tank, water well, solar panels, wind, or generator,  when the grocery store, the doctor, the bank, the car place are more than an hour away! Especially when these problems happen all at once.

A  farmer, not only has to prepare their house for winter, but also make preparations for their animals, and their land. Can’t wrap my mind around never being done! They must have mega resilience! Rooting for them, because I can buy all my veggies at once!
Enough bales of hay?

 

 

What challenges do you face? Or what are you celebrating?
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18 Comments Add yours

  1. Mascha says:

    Razor blades in candys – who makes this!!!???!!
    We are living i a small town, not rural, but we know a border between autumn and winter too. Have a lot to dojust in the garden, and when snow is falling, out town bus always is failed, cannot reach the downtown, the doc or the markets, far away outside of the town, must have a collection of needed foods in home, when I cannot ride my bike, sigh!
    Our temps are in 40 now or colder… but I hope to get some sunny days still in november.
    Have a nice sunday and a good new week 🙂

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  2. Hope you have your wood pile ready for the coming winter! Are the roads up where you are plowed so you can get down to the HWY to get to the market for fresh veggies? We’re wondering how we’ll get across to the house during the winter…if it’s not rented by then.

    Still no renter yet. If we don’t get one soon we probably won’t during winter, but maybe in the Spring?

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    1. jesh stg says:

      Oh yeah, we had to have 7 trees cut, so we’ll be fine for a few winters.We don’t live on a county road, so the plow doesn’t come here! (garbage does though;)) Dpn’t worry, hubby knows how to drive in the snow. If you don’t have a renter by Xmas, maybe be you can “practice” by spending New Years Eve there? Hope you’ll get a renter soon though!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 7 trees! Your trees are HUGE! That’s going to be a job, but on the bright side you will have firewood for quite awhile. Pine burns faster than Oak, but still quite while!

        If we don’t have a renter by Thanksgiving I’m telling the PM to take it off the market and spend some time there this winter. I’ll use that time to see if I can handle the colder winters and snow. In the Spring more people look to moving or changing schools or locations so perhaps that’s when we’ll have more luck renting it. Until then I think there’s a reason it’s not renting so am content.

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  3. Sasa S. says:

    Our All Saint’s Day is very different as US-Halloween, our tradition is to light candles and visit the graves of deceased relatives. But I like the diversity of the world, this make the world interesting.

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  4. Kelleyn says:

    We did a little homesteading when I was a kid. I hated it but my step-father was in his element. He wanted to be grizzley Adams if you know who that is. Not sure if that show ever played in Europe. It was about a guy who left the big city (rat race) to live in the wilderness. I am a city girl. Even livign in this small village of my husbands childhood is hard for me as except for the grocery store their isn’t really any shopping and only a couple of restaurants. Though I would never want to live in New York either.

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  5. Kelleyn says:

    I have been to a many Kaffee Klatsch in the U.S. with Germans who live in the states as my kids go to a German Language School, but haven’t been invited to any here in Germany. No, the cake is made with cream cheese. Though I have had my share of ones made with Quark.

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  6. I loved living in New York City, so I had to chuckle at one of your visitor’s comments. Living in a city like NYC is exhilarating. There is always something to see and do and the most interesting people to meet, The diversity is wonderful and there is a variety of culture and restaurants and parks to visit–never a dull day! That said I also love living in a beautiful state like Colorado, where I can visit wilderness and see the most anazing natural sights, as well as go to cultural events in city like Denver. Best of all worlds!

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  7. I love the new look of the blog!
    Amalia
    xo

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  8. Klara S says:

    Another month has gone. I can’t wait for Halloween and All Saints’ Day. I like them both. Halloween for fun, All Saints’ for pensiveness.

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  9. kenschneider says:

    Although I grew up in the suburbs I always had access to wild areas within walking distance and I fantasized about some dy living in the country. Never happened, though I retired to the mountains of New Mexico. Loved knowing all the neighbors and the small town community. Certainly not off the grid but had to deal with wells, propane and septic tanks and shoveling snow, not to mention concern about wildfire. When they ran a natural gas pipeline it was a red-letter day, almost as exciting as the day when they installed the first traffic light. Loved it and the Land of Enchantment still lives in my heart. Thankfully I have my Wounded Wetlands a short walk from my front door and a lake in back.

    Sorry I had trouble finding the comment section– I’m “almost” certain it was not visible when I looked for it, having scrolled down to the very end of this page. Maybe there were no comments yet and I simply missed the link despite searching for it.

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  10. HALLOWEEN says:

    Never cease to be amazed by people’s cruelty and mindless viciousness! When such brutality is directed against animals and children, I become furious… At least we have family and friends and we can seek some solace and serenity in their company…

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  11. PS: Thanks for hosting, Jesh!

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  12. i’m completely unqualified to comment on winter hardships! Even when we lived and worked in Oregon, our winters were easy compared to ‘up north’ or in the country/mountains. The only hardship being possible depression from long stretches of rainy chilly dark days. And for years now we don’t even have that because we travel away during the winter months. Thank you for hosting and sharing your lovely pictures and interesting thoughts as always!!

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  13. bettyl - NZ says:

    If that old barn could talk!! Most homes are heated by wood here in New Zealand. We have a wood fireplace and, sometimes, run out before winter is over!! I’m glad we have electric heaters for those last few days!

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  14. Joanne Sisco says:

    As much as I fantasize about life in the country, you listed the reasons why it’s not for the faint of heart. I have trouble keeping up with the demands of a city-sized property. I can’t imagine the work involved in managing a farm through the different seasons.

    Like

    1. jesh stg says:

      In the city I didn’t do much work outside either – there are so many distractions one does not have on the country side. Parties only a few times a year, no night life, so there is more energy for daily activities/work. We kind of/sort of landed here because of searching for bigger space for my painting, so I was hardly prepared for country life.

      Liked by 1 person

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